Can we reverse the effects of age related memory loss? Experts say yes

Photo by Milad Fakurian on Unsplash

What did your study find?

We delivered our noninvasive treatment to target memory function through scalp electrodes and found that electrical brain stimulation for 20 minutes on four consecutive days can improve working memory and long-term memory in individuals 65 years and older for at least one month.

A researcher administers the stimulation treatment via a cap. Courtesy of Robert Reinhart

How does this paper expand on your previous study with electrostimulation treatment for memory loss?

In this new study, we used multiple, consecutive days of stimulation for 20 minutes to cause long-lasting memory improvements that lasted one month. Previously, the effects lasted only 50 minutes.

What are the real-world implications of these findings?

An increasingly older population leads to additional personal, social, healthcare and economic costs. A factor greatly contributing to these costs is the impairment in basic memory systems essential for activities of everyday life, such as making financial decisions or understanding language.

What’s next?

Further research is needed to determine whether these effects can last beyond one month and whether these specific methods can also enhance memory function in individuals with impaired cognition due to brain disorders and in those at risk for dementia.

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BU Experts

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Cutting-edge research and commentary out of Boston University, home to Nobel laureates, Pulitzer winners and Guggenheim Scholars. Find an expert: bu.edu/experts